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Legal Complaint Filed on the Kardashian’s Beauty Line

Legal Complaint Filed on the Kardashian’s Khroma Beauty Line

Kardashian's Khroma Beauty Line

Earlier this year the sisters were gearing up for the release of the Kardashian’s Khroma Beauty Line.

You can find the brand debuting at CVS stores.

Khroma offers:

  • Au Naturel Nude Lip sets
  • Lash Dash Luxury Lashes
  • Intimate Spotlight Highlighter
  • Honey Sticks Lip Gloss

Licensing and branding of the products were done by Boldface Group Inc. The line has already launched in the US an is set to launch internationally  in early 2013

Back in June Chroma Makeup Studio issued a public statement saying that the Kardashians’ new beauty line would cause consumer confusion. “Although they didn’t file legal charges, Chroma’s co-owners did threaten to defend their trademarked name, saying that they are “NOT endorsing low budget cosmetic products that will be sold in mass retail outlets,” according to NY Magazine. In October, a LA company called, Chroma Beauty also came at the family with a threat of a lawsuit if they didn’t change their name.  Then…Lee Tillett Inc., an Altamonte Springs, Florida business that owns Kroma Makeup, sent a cease-and-desist letter on June 28 to Boldface Licensing + Branding, holder of the license for the Kardashian makeup line, claiming that Khroma Beauty infringed upon its trademark. Lee Tillett applied to register the mark Kroma in 2010.

However, a representative from Boldface told The Huffington Post a few months back that they too had gone through the necessary steps to secure their name:

“Boldface Licensing + Branding has gone through the appropriate legal channels in obtaining the rights to use the name Khroma Beauty by Kourtney, Kim and Khloé in the Color Category with the United States Patent and Trademark Office, making all proper legal filings.”

Boldface has now, also filed a lawsuit against Lee Tillett Friday in the United States District Court Central District of California Western Division to seek a declaratory judgment that it’s use of the word Khroma doesn’t infringe on Lee Tillett’s use of Kroma. Boldface’s legal complaint states that Lee Tillett’s Kroma “consists solely of a descriptive term and lacks any inherent distinctive meaning to the relevant consuming public and therefore, is conceptually weak,” according to WWD.

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